History

The diversity in the history that has played out along the shores of the Bay of Fundy is as dramatic as the tides themselves.

The region is marked by the Aboriginal, French, English, American Loyalist and Irish peoples that have populated it throughout the years. Each has maintained a strong presence in the area as evident in the local culture, name places, traditions and architecture.

The French Connection

Annapolis RoyalA small island off the Bay of Fundy became the first European settlement in North America in 1604.  Led by Sieur de Mons and accompanied by Samuel Champlain,  and 79 men attempted to settle St. Croix Island.  The first winter was tough on the explorers with ice flows cutting the new settlement off from the main land. Half of the men died of scurvy.  The following summer they moved across the Bay to Port Royal in the present day Annapolis Valley, Nova Scotia.

Some informative links:

Mi’kmaq: The Aboriginal Peoples of Fundy

Mi'kmaq Pow Wow
Mi'kmaq Pow Wow

The aboriginal people that lived in and around the Bay of Fundy spoke the common Algonquin language, and were of the Mi’kmaq, the Montagnais, the Algonquin, the Attikamek, the Nipissing, the Abenaki, the Ottawa and the Ojibway tribes.

Read more about these great peoples:

Loyalist Heritage

In 1783 the Treaty of Paris ended the American Revolution and approximately 40,000 Loyalists fled New England to establish a new life in Europe, England and other parts of British North America, including such Bay of Fundy neighbourhoods as Saint John and Weymouth. Read more about the Loyalists who settled on Fundy’s shores

Discover the historical activities available along the shores of the Bay of Fundy.

8 comments received

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    arthur

    how did the bay of fundy get its name?

      Mike Postma

      There’s some disagreement about that. Some believe the name comes from the French word for split (Fendu), others say that it originates from the Portugese word for funnel (Fondo).

    Darylann

    My great grandfather was drowned in the Bay of Fundy in 1900. His name was James Cole and he was a fireman. The ship, City of Monticello went down and he, with it.
    I understand now why the ship wasn’t able to handle the amazing sea in the Bay of Fundy. I had no idea, and I was born in Massachusetts!
    I would like to know more about the incident and will be seeking out more information about the Acadians, as I have many ancestors.
    Thank you for all the information about the area and people – I appreciate it.

      Mike Postma

      You’re very welcome and thank you for sharing your message with us. Have you stumbled across the following story yet? It’s about the sinking and it names all those aboard by name: http://www.losttothesea.com/stories.php

    danny

    when was the bay of fundy discovered and does any one know when fundy became a national park?

      Mike Postma

      Probably around 1604, when a small island off the Bay of Fundy became the first European settlement in North America (http://bayoffundy.com/about/history/). I believe Fundy National Park wasn’t established as a National Park until 1948.

    Ryan

    My grandfather helped discover fundy national park

    Marielle

    Loving this website.

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